First it was da Vinci. Now Mona Lisa has arrived at Royal Adelaide. The Mona Lisa robot takes prostate biopsies through only two needle punctures.

First it was da Vinci. Now Mona Lisa has arrived in ­Adelaide.

The Mona Lisa robot takes prostate biopsies through two needle punctures in the delicate perineal area between the scrotum and the anus.

Numerous samples can be extracted from the same two puncture holes, whereas previous methods required 24 to 40 needle punctures or a probe inserted through the rectum.

The $300,000 machine fuses MRI and ultrasound information for accuracy to within 1mm. It is overseen by surgeons watching 3D images.

The Royal Adelaide Hospital is the only hospital in South Australia trialling the machine to see if it provides more accurate …

A number of studies indicate the importance of social support to the psychological well-being of patients.

A number of studies indicate the importance of social support to the psychological well-being of patients. Both social isolation and loneliness are associated with increased mortality. Women with fewer social ties to friends, family, community or religious groups were 43 per cent more likely to see their breast cancer return and 64 per cent more likely to die from breast cancer according to a study recently published in the journal Cancer (Read more). CanCare Patient Navigator’s help patients get the right support at the time they need it most. They ‘walk alongside’ a person with cancer, helping them with some …

“Everyone knows about breast cancer, lung cancer, brain cancer. But when they told me what I had I said ‘pancreas? What’s that?'” said Mrs Thompson, 56.

Trish Thompson will tell you she’s a very lucky woman.

A pain in her side sent her to Liverpool Hospital one night in June. Doctors diagnosed her with pancreatic cancer. They caught it early, and they could cut it out.

Pancreatic cancer is dwarfed by the awareness campaigns of other cancers with high incidence rates, but the oft-forgotten condition has the poorest survival rate of them all, with less than seven per cent of patients still alive five years after diagnosis.

The low number of cases and the large proportion of inoperable tumours mean many NSW hospitals have little experience performing pancreatectomies.

“Everyone knows about breast cancer, lung …

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