Scientists link 100 genes to breast cancer

Scientists have linked more than 100 genes to an increased risk of breast cancer – paving the way for more personalised treatments, a study has said.

Scientists have linked more than 100 genes to an increased risk of breast cancer – paving the way for more personalised treatments, a study says.

A team at The Institute of Cancer Research in London identified a “treasure trove” of specific genes involved in raising a woman’s risk of developing the condition.

They also linked 32 genes to the length of time a woman survived the disease.

In the future, testing for these genes could help identify the women most at risk, or could be explored as targets for new drugs, the researchers said.

“Large-scale genomic studies have been instrumental in associating areas of our DNA with an increased risk of breast cancer,” Professor Paul Workman, chief executive of The Institute of Cancer Research, said.

“This study brings these regions of DNA into sharper focus, uncovering a treasure trove of genes that can now be investigated in more detail.

“The ways in which particular genes influence cancer risk are highly complex.

“In the future, a better understanding of the genes identified in this study could lead to the discovery of new targeted drugs, or new strategies to improve diagnosis or prevention of the disease.”

The study, published in the journal Nature Communications, used a new genetic technique to analyse which genes interacted with 33 DNA regions known to affect breast cancer. Read more… 

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